July 12, 2006

Welcome home Hao!

Filed under: News — Rebecca MacKinnon @ 1:37 am

Haoyosemite

(photo of Hao at Yosemite in happier times)

People around the world have been rejoicing since Hao’s sister Nina announced on her blog that Hao has been released from wherever the police were holding him. He is now at home in Beijing with his family. We hope he will rest and take care of himself… and that people will leave him in peace to recover from his ordeal.

It’s impossible to know right now what will happen next, what caused his release at this time, or whether the story is completely over. Doubtless Nina’s hard work and suffering have paid off.

There is also no doubt that all the expressions of support around the world - from media, politicians, bloggers, and other citizens writing letters and signing petitions - have had an impact. We have made it clear to the Chinese government that their treatment of Hao was a cause for national shame. We have given Hao’s family and loved ones moral support in the face of a lot of nastiness and negativity as they worked to get him released. But most importantly, the global show of support will no doubt be a great source of strength as Hao recovers from his ordeal and copes with its aftermath.

Thanks to everybody who has helped.

13 Comments »

  1. While we’re all happy to know that Hao is with his family, please keep in mind that his situation may still be very precarious. Let’s keep our fingers crossed that the worst is behind Hao and his family, and that they can all start to recuperate.

    Comment by Concerned friend — July 12, 2006 @ 3:19 am

  2. Rebecca,
    I check this website very often, I think you did great job for helping haozi from your side. As a chinese lives in middle of nowhere, Personally, I really appreciate what you have done !

    Thanks!
    WantToHaveMouthRestForAWhile :)

    Comment by CannotKeepMouthShut — July 12, 2006 @ 5:21 am

  3. Rebecca, Ethan, I’d like to make a sort of corny suggestion. I don’t want to take my blog badge down yet. But I’d love a “Hao Wu Freed” version - because we don’t want to forget that this has happened to one of us, because it’s something to celebrate as well as remember. Unfortunately I’m not computer literate enough to do it on my own.

    I just want to say “thanks” again. You’ve helped a really great person.

    Comment by Other Lisa — July 12, 2006 @ 5:59 am

  4. Rebecca, Ethan, I’d like to make a sort of corny suggestion. I don’t want to take my blog badge down yet. But I’d love a “Hao Wu Freed” version - because we don’t want to forget that this has happened to one of us, because it’s something to celebrate as well as remember. Unfortunately I’m not computer literate enough to do it on my own.

    I just want to say “thanks” again. You’ve helped a really great person.

    Comment by Other Lisa — July 12, 2006 @ 6:07 am

  5. Hao Wu you hold in your hands, the most precious gift of all: FREEDOM. The freedom to express your thoughts, your love and your vision. The freedom to be who you want to be. Hao Wu has the right to privacy and we should respect it at all times, its indeed the beginning of all freedom.

    Ray

    Comment by Ray Grairo — July 12, 2006 @ 7:44 am

  6. Wu-hoo!…

    I’ve had a “Free Hao Wu” badge in the right-hand sidebar for about two months now. (It was the red square with gold Chinese characters.) And I just found out that, via Instapundit, Hao’s been r……

    Trackback by Riding Sun — July 12, 2006 @ 11:34 am

  7. […] No llegan muchas, pero hoy llegó una buena noticia desde China. Luego de 139 de prisión, incomunicado y sin que su familia conociera los cargos que se le imputaban, el cineasta y bitacorista Hao Wu ha sido liberado por las autoridades de Beijing. […]

    Pingback by Rulemanes para Telémaco :: 139 días después :: July :: 2006 — July 12, 2006 @ 1:56 pm

  8. It is incredible news that Hao Wu has been freed by the Chinese government. After reading the article in the Wall Street Journal on July 3, 2006 I feared that the Chinese government would just dig its heals in and refuse to ever free him. Wu’s sister did an excellent job getting the news out about the detention of her brother and is to be congratulated on her hard work to achieve his release. My hope is that Wu will be able to come back to the United States, and continue with his career.

    Comment by Diane — July 12, 2006 @ 4:56 pm

  9. I am so glad to hear that and thanks should be given to you as one who helped get the story out there, so that myself and others could write our letters.
    Maybe it made the difference, probably not. But it is a time to be optimistic for him.

    Comment by Zebster — July 12, 2006 @ 7:30 pm

  10. I’m a former co-worker of Hao’s at EarthLink in Atlanta, GA. Please pass on this message of support and thought to him. There are many people in the EarthLink headquarters who have been thinking of him besides myself (M.Strutton, S.Currie, W.Harrison, etc.)…the list is too long to go on. I hope to share a pint one day with you Hao and hear all about your story.

    Comment by d.i. roberts — July 13, 2006 @ 1:50 pm

  11. […] Chinese filmmaker is finally released from prison. Also in the What were they thinking department: Heavy-handed russian police arrest dissidents. In the meantime Russia and US announce a deal on WTO membership for Russia. […]

    Pingback by Idiotprogrammer » Blog Archive » 7 Minute Link Dump — July 13, 2006 @ 3:04 pm

  12. happy to hear that Hao has been released, quite a few of his fellow EarthLinkers have been thinking of him, and I can say that we’re all happy to hear he is back home resting and recovering. Good wishes to Hao and his family!

    Comment by Roberta — July 14, 2006 @ 4:45 pm

  13. […] Hao maintained an online journal called Beijing or Bust, under the nom-de-blog “Beijing Loafer.” His sister, Na (aka Nina) Wu, reported on her fight to free her brother at wuhaofamily.spaces.msn.com throughout his imprisonment. Ethan Zuckerman and Rebecca McKinnon of Global Voices translated Na’s posts and petitioned in English for his release here. Today, Rebecca writes: It’s impossible to know right now what will happen next, what caused his release at this time, or whether the story is completely over. Doubtless Nina’s hard work and suffering have paid off. […]

    Pingback by newsBreaks.net » China: imprisoned blogger Hao Wu freed after 140 days — July 28, 2006 @ 3:01 pm

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